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Interview: Max Anstie Part 2

More terrific insight from the Brit.

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Part Two of our interview with Max Anstie covers topics such as working with Justin Brayton, Dean Wilson and Wilson Todd, the key differences between racing MXGP and in America and the joy being a father brings.

Read Part 1 Here


Words: Edward Stratmann | Lead Image: Maeda WSX


Edward Stratmann
That’s great to hear you’re revitalised and really want to attack the challenge of the year ahead. I wanted to ask how has it been working with Wilson Todd and someone you know well in Dean Wilson?

Max Anstie
So Dean is based in California, though, to be honest, we haven’t seen him too much. We’ve only seen him a little bit when he comes in after testing. Obviously, I’ve known Dean for years, with racing Nations together and all that so me and Dean get along really well. And it’s kind of cool, because the last few years we’ve been racing each other so it’s kind of nice that he’s on the 450 and I’m on a 250. Even when he comes over here for practice we can do motos together and it’s not the typical, head to head battles so that’s been cool.

Then, with Wilson Todd, I have spent a lot of time with him obviously in Australia and throughout the last few months. He’s a really nice guy and I think he’s come a long way with his supercross riding. Even Kyle Webster you know, Kyle was over here training at MTF for a while – got on really well with him. Like I said, I get on really well with the Aussies so it’s been good fun. And also having Justin Brayton riding around for the Australian stuff was really cool. You know, before Wagga Wagga, we were out playing tennis pretty much every day at the place where we were staying. We were out riding, it all was good fun.

It’s been really good to have a good group of people and Wilson Todd’s been great at the moment because he’s my training partner right now. We’re flat out doing motos, you know, yesterday we were riding together and it’s just me and him out there and man can he send it in a few turns. He really can. When he gets the hang of supercross, watch out. I wouldn’t want to be racing him outdoors either. Let’s put it that way. I definitely wouldn’t want to be coming back to race the Australian outdoor champion (laughs). He’s been riding really well and I feel like outdoors is his speciality.

Edward Stratmann
Wilson Todd could obviously do some damage over in MXGP like he did in MX2, but would it be worth his while compared to his current program?

Max Anstie
I’ve raced GPs and I love GPs. You know, I love the people and I love travelling. But if you’re not making money, there isn’t any point doing it. Alright, you go all the way over there getting 50 grand and you can barely make your way around on that. They’re going to pay for your cheap flights. It’s almost not worth it whereas at least racing supercross you make money and you make bonus money. You’re racing for wins is the biggest thing in this supercross. 250 classes are alright too, you might not sign on for very much, but you’re going be doing that in GPs anyway unless you’re in the top five. You’ve got guys that are riding for free or bringing money so you’re going to be a second rider, a second rider getting paid not much. You’re not getting the same treatment. You’re banging your head against the wall. Yes, the bikes on the top teams over there are so good. But If you’re not on a decent bike and a decent team, you’ve got no chance.

Whereas here with supercross, you don’t have to be on Star Yamaha and you can still compete and if you’re inside that top five/top eight you’re making good money with bonuses so you race for money, which is quite nice. You’ve got an incentive to go out there. I mean, it’s 40 or 50 grand a win in the 250 class. In the 450, it’s like 100 grand if not more if you’re a top boy. So honestly, I’m not sure what Wilson is going to end up doing. I certainly like doing what I’m doing right now. I’ve got no interest in going back to GPs.

Supercross is definitely where it’s at money wise, bonuses wise, you just have to be good at it. It’s one of those where is there any point in Wilson going back to the GPs? He’s making good money racing in Australia for Yarrive and doing supercross. I would stay and do this, but each person also has their own battles to go through.

I’ve been lucky enough to have raced almost every major championship. I’ve raced the British Championship, the Dutch championship, plus I’ve raced the World Championship for years, American outdoors, American Supercross and Australian SX. I’ve literally done everything apart from Australian outdoors, and Yarrive wanted me to do some, but I thought no (laughs).

I’ve seen every side of the coin and every every side of it, and I really do think that this World Supercross will be great if it can continue to grow, and that brings fans in from all over the world. The riders get paid. And I’m really excited for what the future holds. And I love travelling. It’s great for my family. It’s great for people all over Europe. I’ve got friends from during my time in GPs to be able to come and watch and like I said, I love supercross. It’s been great.

I really do feel like I’m lucky that from when I was seven years old, my dad built me many Supercross tracks and that’s all I ever did. I raced a British Supercross when I was eight years old. I used to ride in the sand on the weekends and do supercross all week. I was on a 65 or an 85. I just used to have a little mini supercross track and basically up until I was 16/17, I just mainly rode supercross and was in America – then turned pro when I was 16. Raced supercross and then ended up going back to Europe. And it was kind of just chasing that next salary, next paycheck for this team, ride for that team. And I got good in Europe, and I loved Europe, and I loved GPs and I loved that goal. But in a weird way, I also hated some of the tracks. The hardpack tracks like Loket in the Czech Republic and some of the Italian tracks, I just wasn’t a fan. If there wasn’t something soft to turn off against I was struggling.

Then I realised, well hold on “what am I doing, I was always brought up to do supercross”? And once the opportunity presented itself to come back to America. I recognised this is where I was meant to be. I know I missed a lot of years of experience in the U.S, but I got a lot of experience with GPs and racing. And I think I’m picking it up pretty fast now.

So whether I’m a contender this year in supercross, or whether it’s going to be next year, I’m definitely working towards that goal. I feel like I’m Jett Lawrence. You know, I feel like I’m an 18-year-old kid just learning and trying to be better every day. I’m definitely not bored of riding and am definitely not burnt out with any of it. It’s like a whole new start for me so it’s been great. I think it’s given me longevity in my career here and opened up some doors in this 250 class. I’m loving it. I like working with Yarrive and Martin and the boys I’ve got here and it’s fun. Justin Brayton gave me a unique perspective and there’s no reason why I can’t do that and I want to just continue to grow and to be better and better.

Edward Stratmann
How are you going with being a father? How’s that experience been for you?

Max Anstie
It’s been great. And talking about racing East coast. It’s nice to be able to do East coast for the little one to come over to the track and watch him riding too. I got Sam from SKDA to send me some little graphics for a Strider that I just got. I had my first dad job of putting stickers on and there were bubbles all over the place, but if you don’t get too close to the bike it’s fine (laughs). It looks good. And then I’ve just gone and bought myself a pit bike as well. I said it is for little ones so that every day I come home, I can stick him on the front and ride him around the garden. It’s been awesome.

It’s definitely tough sometimes for my wife especially because, you know, we’re here alone, without family nearby. Most of our family is all overseas. I mean my Dad’s in California, but that’s quite far away. So it’s just us, but now we’re doing well, and he’s 10 months now and started crawling everywhere. So it’s getting interesting that’s for sure.

Edward Stratmann
One more before you go, Who are your picks for the 450 Supercross and MXGP titles this year?

Max Anstie
Well, I mean, it’s hard to bet against Tomac after his performance at A1. But Sexton’s riding well. I think it’s going to be between Tomac and Sexton for the 450 class. There’s so many good riders. I look at that class and I’m actually quite happy I’m not racing in that class. Webb rode great, he’s only getting better, but it’s tough honestly. It’s hard to not disrespect any of them by not naming anyone because even Malcolm and Cooper Webb are solid. Then there’s Ferrandis and Andersen. Honestly, there’s so many guys that are good. It’s going to iron itself out in the next three, four or five races.

For the GPs I mean obviously Jeffrey’s back and he’s riding really well, but I watched Gajser earlier and he’s got a really good facility. If I was doing GPs and had the money to be able to do it, that is the way to do it – have your own place. Herlings does well because basically every track in Holland he can go to wherever he wants, which is very good. But the way Gajser is running the system over there is very, very professional and is as close to an American setup as you can get, which I would have ideally loved to do because all these riders that go and live in Belgium or Holland when it isn’t their home, it’s so weird, but you still lose a few percent because you’re not at home. I think it’s going to be between Gajser and Herlings again. Febvre will obviously be coming back strong too.

It’s definitely going to be a good series to keep an eye on.

Thank you for your time and all the best for 2023.

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Features

AMA Supercross St. Louis – The Track

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We are already at round twelve of the AMA Supercross Championship and this weekend we are racing at St. Louis.  Below you can get an idea of the track for this Saturday!

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Features

Stat Attack: Indianapolis Supercross Review

See now.

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With the tenth round of AMA Supercross in the books, statistics maestro Paul Pearcy has provided MX Vice with some brilliant numbers to tuck into from what was a great night of action. Enjoy

250 Class

Qualifying

  • Top 3
  1. Max Anstie: 49.492
  2. Tom Vialle: 49.492; (Max got top spot because his time came in the first session, while Tom’s time came in the second session)
  3. Pierce Brown: 49.719

LCQ

  • Top 3
  1. Jeremy Martin
  2. Ryder Floyd
  3. Hardy Munoz
  • Laps Led
  1. Jeremy Martin: 5
  2. Hardy Munoz: 2
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Jeremy Martin: 52.413
  2. Preston Boespflug: 53.150
  3. Gage Linville: 53.549
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Jeremy Martin: 53.655
  2. Preston Boespflug: 54.259
  3. Ryder Floyd: 54.373

Race 1

  • Top 3
  1. Cameron Mcadoo
  2. Haiden Deegan
  3. Seth Hammaker
  • Laps Led
  1. Cameron Mcadoo: 12
  2. Daxton Bennick: 1
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Haiden Deegan: 49.561
  2. Tom Vialle: 49.660
  3. Cameron Mcadoo: 49.854
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Cameron Mcadoo: 50.830
  2. Haiden Deegan: 51.086
  3. Seth Hammaker: 51.907
  • Most Consistent Lap Times (Least difference between fastest and slowest lap times)
  1. Preston Boespflug: 2.970
  2. Cameron Mcadoo: 3.184
  3. Jalek Swoll: 3.287

Race 2

  • Top 3
  1. Haiden Deegan
  2. Cameron Mcadoo
  3. Tom Vialle
  • Laps Led
  1. Haiden Deegan: 12
  2. Jalek Swoll: 1
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Haiden Deegan: 49.493
  2. Tom Vialle: 50.690
  3. Pierce Brown: 50.868
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Haiden Deegan: 51.522
  2. Cameron Mcadoo: 52.214
  3. Tom Vialle: 52.580
  • Most Consistent Lap Times (Least difference between fastest and slowest lap times)
  1. Jeremy Hand: 2.040
  2. Coty Schock: 2.315
  3. Max Anstie: 2.634

Race 3

  • Top 3
  1. Tom Vialle
  2. Pierce Brown
  3. Cameron Mcadoo
  • Laps Led
  1. Tom Vialle: 13
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Tom Vialle: 49.844
  2. Chance Hymas: 50.020
  3. Cameron Mcadoo: 50.175
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Tom Vialle: 51.493
  2. Pierce Brown: 51.563
  3. Haiden Deegan: 51.892
  • Most Consistent Lap Times (Least difference between fastest and slowest lap times)
  1. Marshal Weltin: 1.984
  2. Seth Hammaker: 1.997
  3. Nick Romano: 2.233

Overall

  • Top 3
  1. Cameron Mcadoo; (1st win of the season, 80% podium rate this year)
  2. Tom Vialle; (80% podium rate this year)
  3. Haiden Deegan; (40% podium rate this season)
  • Laps Led
  1. Tom Vialle: 13; (Tom is now tied with Austin Forkner for most laps led this season at 37.  34% of total laps raced)
  2. Cameron Mcadoo: 12
  3. Haiden Deegan: 12
  4. Jalek Swoll: 1
  5. Daxton Bennick: 1
  • Best First Lap Position Average
  1. Tom Vialle: 3rd 
  2. Cameron Mcadoo: 3.333
  3. Jalek Swoll: 4th 

Points

  • Top 10
  1. Cameron Mcadoo: 98
  2. Tom Vialle: 96
  3. Pierce Brown: 87
  4. Haiden Deegan: 82
  5. Coty Schock: 79
  6. Seth Hammaker: 72
  7. Daxton Bennick: 71
  8. Max Anstie: 62
  9. Chance Hymas: 60
  10. Jalek Swoll: 58

450 Class

Qualifying

  • Top 3
  1. Jett Lawrence: 48.523
  2. Eli Tomac: 48.554
  3. Cooper Webb: 48.568; (The difference between 1st and 3rd was .045 seconds.)

LCQ

  • Top 3
  1. Kyle Chisholm
  2. Justin Starling
  3. Devin Simonson
  • Laps Led
  1. Kyle Chisholm: 7
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Ty Masterpool: 52.415
  2. Kyle Chisholm: 52.810
  3. Freddie Noren: 53.248
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Kyle Chisholm: 54.223
  2. Ryan Breece: 54.271
  3. Freddie Noren: 54.390

Race 1

  • Top 3
  1. Jett Lawrence
  2. Ken Roczen
  3. Chase Sexton
  • Laps Led
  1. Jett Lawrence: 10
  2. Ken Roczen: 6
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Jett Lawrence: 48.639
  2. Ken Roczen: 49.225
  3. Cooper Webb: 49.581
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Jett Lawrence: 51.023
  2. Cooper Webb: 51.383
  3. Ken Roczen: 51.402
  • Most Consistent Lap Times (Least difference between fastest and slowest lap times)
  1. Aaron Plessinger: 2.774
  2. Eli Tomac: 3.095
  3. Chase Sexton: 3.785

Race 2

  • Top 3
  1. Jett Lawrence
  2. Ken Roczen
  3. Chase Sexton
  • Laps Led
  1. Jett Lawrence: 10
  2. Ken Roczen: 6
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Jett Lawrence: 49.499
  2. Ken Roczen: 49.713
  3. Chase Sexton: 49.849
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Jett Lawrence: 50.735
  2. Chase Sexton: 50.884
  3. Ken Roczen: 50.908 (That’s a difference of .173 in average lap times over 16 laps)
  • Most Consistent Lap Times (Least difference between fastest and slowest lap times)
  1. Ken Roczen: 2.537
  2. Malcolm Stewart: 2.641
  3. Chase Sexton: 2.676

Race 3

  • Top 3
  1. Jett Lawrence
  2. Chase Sexton 
  3. Ken Roczen
  • Laps Led
  1. Ken Roczen: 10
  2. Jett Lawrence: 6
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Ken Roczen: 49.131
  2. Chase Sexton: 49.284
  3. Jett Lawrence: 49.314
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Jett Lawrence: 50.477
  2. Chase Sexton: 50.483
  3. Cooper Webb: 50.594; (That’s a difference of .117 in average lap times over 16 laps)
  • Most Consistent Lap Times (Least difference between fastest and slowest lap times)
  1. Chase Sexton: 2.528
  2. Cooper Webb: 2.885
  3. Jason Anderson: 3.079

Overall

  • Top 3
  1. Jett Lawrence; (The only other person to have a perfect sweep at a triple crown was Ken Roczen in 2020 also on a Honda.  Jett has now won 50% of the races this season, with a 60% podium rate)
  2. Ken Roczen; (Ken has a 50% podium rate this year)
  3. Chase Sexton; (Chase has a 50% podium rate this year)
  • Laps Led
  1. Jett Lawrence: 26; (Jett now has 130 laps led, 50.7% of total laps)
  2. Ken Roczen: 22; (Ken has the second most laps led at 49, Just 19% of total laps)
  • Best First Lap Position Average
  1. Ken Roczen: 1st 
  2. Jett Lawrence: 2nd 
  3. Jason Anderson: 4th 

Points

  • Top 10
  1. Jett Lawrence: 210
  2. Cooper Webb: 189
  3. Chase Sexton: 185
  4. Ken Roczen: 175
  5. Eli Tomac: 174
  6. Jason Anderson: 165
  7. Aaron Plessinger: 162
  8. Justin Cooper: 120
  9. Justin Barcia: 109
  10. Dylan Ferrandis: 107

Lead Image: HRC

Love what we do? Please read this article as we try to raise £30,000.

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British MX Nationals

Thank you. It’s been a hell of a ride.

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Since buying back MX Vice in November 2019, it has been challenging. One of those crystal balls would have been handy for navigating some problematic situations. Who would have thought COVID-19 would be a thing?

Those who follow MX Vice know we started from nothing but an idea. A fan who loved the sport created a Facebook page, website, and social media presence that would become disruptive. It has made numerous talented media people who were allowed to run with it for over thirteen years. Being in the UK/Europe has always been difficult; I’ve always believed that if we were a US media company, we would have been embraced and appreciated for our work ethic and the content we produce. We always cast one eye over the US in Europe, and you can’t blame the top European riders for doing the same.

MX Vice has always tried to give people a voice, especially the riders who are not in the limelight and the teams that put so much into the sport. We love people’s passion and sacrifice to improve and challenge themselves. That, for me, was the natural pull, not the money but the passion and sacrifice. We all know we would not be in motocross if it were about the money. I always considered MX Vice the media version of Steve Dixon’s team in MXGP (which I have a huge amount of respect for), where we have always tried to challenge without the factory budgets.

We knew it would be tough this year with so many businesses and brands cutting marketing budgets and reducing costs; this was never going to be good for us. We have just had two incredible months of stats, with January and February bringing in over 1 million people to the website, which is quite bittersweet. As much as the funds are low, so is my energy and health. COVID impacted me more than I could ever envisaged. My health has deteriorated ever since I caught COVID; my immune system is not in a great place, and when I try and work to the standard I set myself, my body breaks on me, and it takes me days to recover. Ed Stratmann has been a revelation since he took the editorial reigns and has pushed MX Vice to new heights, which is incredible given the lack of resources he has had to work with and support from myself. I have been missing from the podcast show to reduce my time, as I am now self-employed and working for two companies to pay the bills.

Every journey ends, and that’s not what we want. Over the past 13 years, we have given it everything, leaving no stone unturned. We’re proud of how we have disrupted, challenged decisions, held organisations accountable, and illuminated incredible stories.

We will have an auction for signed shirts donated by riders, podcast equipment, and memorabilia to pay off the invoices of some contributors. If, however, you want to see MX Vice continue, you can donate here: https://ko-fi.com/mxvice or purchase a shirt or memorabilia. If we meet our target of £25,000, which is currently outstanding to run this year, then Ed and I will continue. However, we fully expect this won’t happen due to the large sum required.

It’s hard out there at the moment. Take care of your health and family, and never lose your passion for the most fantastic sport in the world.

Burf.

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