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Interview: Max Anstie Part 2

More terrific insight from the Brit.

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Part Two of our interview with Max Anstie covers topics such as working with Justin Brayton, Dean Wilson and Wilson Todd, the key differences between racing MXGP and in America and the joy being a father brings.

Read Part 1 Here


Words: Edward Stratmann | Lead Image: Maeda WSX


Edward Stratmann
That’s great to hear you’re revitalised and really want to attack the challenge of the year ahead. I wanted to ask how has it been working with Wilson Todd and someone you know well in Dean Wilson?

Max Anstie
So Dean is based in California, though, to be honest, we haven’t seen him too much. We’ve only seen him a little bit when he comes in after testing. Obviously, I’ve known Dean for years, with racing Nations together and all that so me and Dean get along really well. And it’s kind of cool, because the last few years we’ve been racing each other so it’s kind of nice that he’s on the 450 and I’m on a 250. Even when he comes over here for practice we can do motos together and it’s not the typical, head to head battles so that’s been cool.

Then, with Wilson Todd, I have spent a lot of time with him obviously in Australia and throughout the last few months. He’s a really nice guy and I think he’s come a long way with his supercross riding. Even Kyle Webster you know, Kyle was over here training at MTF for a while – got on really well with him. Like I said, I get on really well with the Aussies so it’s been good fun. And also having Justin Brayton riding around for the Australian stuff was really cool. You know, before Wagga Wagga, we were out playing tennis pretty much every day at the place where we were staying. We were out riding, it all was good fun.

It’s been really good to have a good group of people and Wilson Todd’s been great at the moment because he’s my training partner right now. We’re flat out doing motos, you know, yesterday we were riding together and it’s just me and him out there and man can he send it in a few turns. He really can. When he gets the hang of supercross, watch out. I wouldn’t want to be racing him outdoors either. Let’s put it that way. I definitely wouldn’t want to be coming back to race the Australian outdoor champion (laughs). He’s been riding really well and I feel like outdoors is his speciality.

Edward Stratmann
Wilson Todd could obviously do some damage over in MXGP like he did in MX2, but would it be worth his while compared to his current program?

Max Anstie
I’ve raced GPs and I love GPs. You know, I love the people and I love travelling. But if you’re not making money, there isn’t any point doing it. Alright, you go all the way over there getting 50 grand and you can barely make your way around on that. They’re going to pay for your cheap flights. It’s almost not worth it whereas at least racing supercross you make money and you make bonus money. You’re racing for wins is the biggest thing in this supercross. 250 classes are alright too, you might not sign on for very much, but you’re going be doing that in GPs anyway unless you’re in the top five. You’ve got guys that are riding for free or bringing money so you’re going to be a second rider, a second rider getting paid not much. You’re not getting the same treatment. You’re banging your head against the wall. Yes, the bikes on the top teams over there are so good. But If you’re not on a decent bike and a decent team, you’ve got no chance.

Whereas here with supercross, you don’t have to be on Star Yamaha and you can still compete and if you’re inside that top five/top eight you’re making good money with bonuses so you race for money, which is quite nice. You’ve got an incentive to go out there. I mean, it’s 40 or 50 grand a win in the 250 class. In the 450, it’s like 100 grand if not more if you’re a top boy. So honestly, I’m not sure what Wilson is going to end up doing. I certainly like doing what I’m doing right now. I’ve got no interest in going back to GPs.

Supercross is definitely where it’s at money wise, bonuses wise, you just have to be good at it. It’s one of those where is there any point in Wilson going back to the GPs? He’s making good money racing in Australia for Yarrive and doing supercross. I would stay and do this, but each person also has their own battles to go through.

I’ve been lucky enough to have raced almost every major championship. I’ve raced the British Championship, the Dutch championship, plus I’ve raced the World Championship for years, American outdoors, American Supercross and Australian SX. I’ve literally done everything apart from Australian outdoors, and Yarrive wanted me to do some, but I thought no (laughs).

I’ve seen every side of the coin and every every side of it, and I really do think that this World Supercross will be great if it can continue to grow, and that brings fans in from all over the world. The riders get paid. And I’m really excited for what the future holds. And I love travelling. It’s great for my family. It’s great for people all over Europe. I’ve got friends from during my time in GPs to be able to come and watch and like I said, I love supercross. It’s been great.

I really do feel like I’m lucky that from when I was seven years old, my dad built me many Supercross tracks and that’s all I ever did. I raced a British Supercross when I was eight years old. I used to ride in the sand on the weekends and do supercross all week. I was on a 65 or an 85. I just used to have a little mini supercross track and basically up until I was 16/17, I just mainly rode supercross and was in America – then turned pro when I was 16. Raced supercross and then ended up going back to Europe. And it was kind of just chasing that next salary, next paycheck for this team, ride for that team. And I got good in Europe, and I loved Europe, and I loved GPs and I loved that goal. But in a weird way, I also hated some of the tracks. The hardpack tracks like Loket in the Czech Republic and some of the Italian tracks, I just wasn’t a fan. If there wasn’t something soft to turn off against I was struggling.

Then I realised, well hold on “what am I doing, I was always brought up to do supercross”? And once the opportunity presented itself to come back to America. I recognised this is where I was meant to be. I know I missed a lot of years of experience in the U.S, but I got a lot of experience with GPs and racing. And I think I’m picking it up pretty fast now.

So whether I’m a contender this year in supercross, or whether it’s going to be next year, I’m definitely working towards that goal. I feel like I’m Jett Lawrence. You know, I feel like I’m an 18-year-old kid just learning and trying to be better every day. I’m definitely not bored of riding and am definitely not burnt out with any of it. It’s like a whole new start for me so it’s been great. I think it’s given me longevity in my career here and opened up some doors in this 250 class. I’m loving it. I like working with Yarrive and Martin and the boys I’ve got here and it’s fun. Justin Brayton gave me a unique perspective and there’s no reason why I can’t do that and I want to just continue to grow and to be better and better.

Edward Stratmann
How are you going with being a father? How’s that experience been for you?

Max Anstie
It’s been great. And talking about racing East coast. It’s nice to be able to do East coast for the little one to come over to the track and watch him riding too. I got Sam from SKDA to send me some little graphics for a Strider that I just got. I had my first dad job of putting stickers on and there were bubbles all over the place, but if you don’t get too close to the bike it’s fine (laughs). It looks good. And then I’ve just gone and bought myself a pit bike as well. I said it is for little ones so that every day I come home, I can stick him on the front and ride him around the garden. It’s been awesome.

It’s definitely tough sometimes for my wife especially because, you know, we’re here alone, without family nearby. Most of our family is all overseas. I mean my Dad’s in California, but that’s quite far away. So it’s just us, but now we’re doing well, and he’s 10 months now and started crawling everywhere. So it’s getting interesting that’s for sure.

Edward Stratmann
One more before you go, Who are your picks for the 450 Supercross and MXGP titles this year?

Max Anstie
Well, I mean, it’s hard to bet against Tomac after his performance at A1. But Sexton’s riding well. I think it’s going to be between Tomac and Sexton for the 450 class. There’s so many good riders. I look at that class and I’m actually quite happy I’m not racing in that class. Webb rode great, he’s only getting better, but it’s tough honestly. It’s hard to not disrespect any of them by not naming anyone because even Malcolm and Cooper Webb are solid. Then there’s Ferrandis and Andersen. Honestly, there’s so many guys that are good. It’s going to iron itself out in the next three, four or five races.

For the GPs I mean obviously Jeffrey’s back and he’s riding really well, but I watched Gajser earlier and he’s got a really good facility. If I was doing GPs and had the money to be able to do it, that is the way to do it – have your own place. Herlings does well because basically every track in Holland he can go to wherever he wants, which is very good. But the way Gajser is running the system over there is very, very professional and is as close to an American setup as you can get, which I would have ideally loved to do because all these riders that go and live in Belgium or Holland when it isn’t their home, it’s so weird, but you still lose a few percent because you’re not at home. I think it’s going to be between Gajser and Herlings again. Febvre will obviously be coming back strong too.

It’s definitely going to be a good series to keep an eye on.

Thank you for your time and all the best for 2023.

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Features

Stat Attack: Arlington Supercross Review

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With the seventh round of AMA Supercross in the books, statistics maestro Paul Pearcy has provided MX Vice with some brilliant numbers to tuck into from what was a great night of action. Enjoy

250 Class

Qualifying

  • Qualifying Top 3
  1. Seth Hammaker: 45.216
  2. Austin Forkner: 45.284
  3. Pierce Brown: 45.416

Heat Race 1

  • Top 3
  1. Austin Forkner (2 for 2 in heat race wins)
  2. Max Anstie
  3. Haiden Deegan
  • Laps Led
  1. Haiden Deegan: 7
  2. Austin Forkner: 2 (12 heat race laps led this year, 4 more than anyone else)
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Austin Forkner: 45.908
  2. Haiden Deegan: 46.194
  3. Max Anstie: 46.244
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Austin Forkner: 46.448
  2. Max Anstie: 46.970
  3. Haiden Deegan: 47.321

Heat Race 2

  • Top 3
  1. Cameron Mcadoo (2 for 2 in heat race wins)
  2. Nicholas Romano
  3. Seth Hammaker
  • Laps Led
  1. Nicholas Romano: 5
  2. Cameron Mcadoo: 4 (4th best in heat race laps led this season)
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Pierce Brown: 46.512
  2. Cameron Mcadoo: 46.527
  3. Chance Hymas: 46.533
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Cameron Mcadoo: 47.200
  2. Chance Hymas: 47.461
  3. Seth Hammaker: 47.841

LCQ

  • Top 3
  1. Daxton Bennick
  2. Izaih Clark
  3. Brock Papi
  • Laps Led
  1. Daxton Bennick: 8
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Daxton Bennick: 47.693
  2. Hardy Munoz: 48.254
  3. Izaih Clark: 48.653
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Daxton Bennick: 48.925
  2. Brock Papi: 49.358
  3. Izaih Clark: 49.379

Main Event

  • Top 3
  1. Haiden Deegan
  2. Cameron Mcadoo
  3. Tom Vialle
  • First Lap Top 3
  1. Austin Forkner (Best in Class Average First Lap Position of 1st)
  2. Haiden Deegan (Average First Lap Position of 9th)
  3. Nicholas Romano (Average First Lap Position of 9th)
  • Laps Led
  1. Austin Forkner: 16 (Austin has led 88% of main event laps this season)
  2. Haiden Deegan: 5
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Austin Forkner: 45.926
  2. Chance Hymas: 46.008
  3. Haiden Deegan: 46.010
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Austin Forkner: 46.537
  2. Haiden Deegan: 47.076
  3. Cameron Mcadoo: 47.326
  • Most Consistent Lap Times (Least difference between fastest and slowest lap times)
  1. Austin Forkner: 1.41
  2. Tom Vialle: 2.212
  3. Pierce Brown: 2.456

Points

  • Points Top Ten
  1. Max Anstie: 38
  2. Pierce Brown: 34
  3. Daxton Bennick: 32
  4. Coty Schock: 32
  5. Haiden Deegan: 31
  6. Cameron Mcadoo: 29
  7. Austin Forkner: 27
  8. Chance Hymas: 27
  9. Guillem Farres: 27
  10. Henry Miller: 26

450 Class

Qualifying

  • Top 3
  1. Jett Lawrence: 43.770 (3rd time this season; best qualifying average in the class at 2.857 through 7 rounds)
  2. Chase Sexton: 44.262
  3. Justin Cooper: 44.280

Heat Race 1

  • Top 3
  1. Eli Tomac
  2. Aaron Plessinger (best average heat race finish at 1.667)
  3. Ken Roczen (2nd best average heat race finish at 2nd)
  • Laps Led
  1. Aaron Plessinger: 9 (Aaron has led 34% of heat race laps this year, 16 more than anyone else)
  2. Eli Tomac: 1
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Aaron Plessinger: 43.610
  2. Ken Roczen: 43.622
  3. Eli Tomac: 43.874
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Eli Tomac: 44.408
  2. Aaron Plessinger: 44.668
  3. Ken Roczen: 44.854

Heat Race 2

  • Top 3
  1. Jett Lawrence (3rd best average heat race finish at 2.667)
  2. Malcolm Stewart
  3. Jason Anderson
  • Laps Led
  1. Jason Anderson: 5
  2. Jett Lawrence: 3
  3. Malcolm Stewart: 2
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Malcolm Stewart: 44.393
  2. Jett Lawrence: 44.558
  3. Jason Anderson: 44.662
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Jett Lawrence: 45.474
  2. Malcolm Stewart: 45.622
  3. Jason Anderson: 46.001

LCQ

  • Top 3
  1. Justin Barcia
  2. Jerry Robin
  3. Ryan Breece (First main event since Salt Lake City 2022; Missed all of 2023 due to injury)
  • Laps Led
  1. Justin Barcia: 8
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Justin Barcia: 46.050
  2. Jerry Robin: 46.466
  3. Ryan Breece: 46.792
  • Best Average Lap Times
  1. Justin Barcia: 46.764
  2. Jerry Robin: 47.126
  3. Ryan Breece: 47.359

Main Event

  • Top 3
  1. Cooper Webb (Tied with Plessinger for 2nd best average finish at 4.571; this is his 6th win in Arlington)
  2. Eli Tomac
  3. Aaron Plessinger (Tied with Webb for 2nd best average finish at 4.571)
  • First Lap Top 3
  1. Jett Lawrence (3rd best in class Average First Lap Position of 6.047)
  2. Cooper Webb (Best in Class Average First Lap Position of 5.428)
  3. Hunter Lawrence (Average First Lap Position of 8.055)
  • Laps Led
  1. Jett Lawrence: 23 (Jett has led 41% of main event laps this season at 71, 44 more than anyone else)
  2. Cooper Webb: 4
  • Fastest Lap Times
  1. Jett Lawrence: 45.147
  2. Chase Sexton: 45.222
  3. Justin Cooper: 45.385
  • Best Average Lap Time
  1. Cooper Webb: 46.578
  2. Eli Tomac: 46.590
  3. Aaron Plessinger: 46.729
  • Most Consistent Lap Times (Least difference between fastest and slowest lap times)
  1. Aaron Plessinger: 2.699
  2. Cooper Webb: 2.762
  3. Justin Cooper: 3.427

Points

  • Points Top 10
  1. Jett Lawrence: 135
  2. Cooper Webb: 132
  3. Aaron Plessinger: 128
  4. Chase Sexton: 127
  5. Eli Tomac: 122
  6. Jason Anderson: 118
  7. Ken Roczen: 116
  8. Dylan Ferrandis: 93
  9. Hunter Lawrence: 86
  10. Justin Cooper: 75

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Australian Motocross

Gallery: New-look Raceline Husqvarna Racing Team unveiled for 2024

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Introducing the Raceline Husqvarna Racing Team for season 2024. Led by MX1 contender Todd Waters alongside MX2 title prospects Rhys Budd and Jack Mather, the team’s primed for a massive season. Check out their epic season launching gallery by Michael Williams (@postmoto_ on Instagram).

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Features

BELL MX 2024 Moto-10 spherical helmet review

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MX Vice’s Tester, Brad Wheeler, Shares His Thoughts On This Quality Product From Bell.

I’m not going to sit here and pretend that this is an exclusive review of the BELL Moto-10, the best  I can offer is that this is the first review on the 2024 Eli Tomac edition. 2024 has seen an array of  new colourways and hopefully, you’ll learn something from this review that you didn’t know  previously. Besides, MX Vice is yet to post a BELL Moto-10 review so the start of a new season  seemed like a good time to do one.


Words: Brad Wheeler | Lead Image: Supplied


The Moto-10 was first released back in 2021, and since then has cemented itself as one of, if not  the most popular high-end helmet. BELL has been in the helmet game since 1975 and has always  been at the forefront of design and safety. The Moto-10 is no different.

I found that their 3K carbon shell worked great in keeping me cool whilst riding. Not only is it great  and excels at getting cool air through the helmet, but it disperses the hot air even better. This is down to the  T.E.A.S (Thermal Exchange Airflow System). It sucks air in like a vacuum and sends the hot air out the rear and side exhaust ports. Due to the Moto-10 having a split shell (top and bottom), it was easy for BELL to utilise this as a very efficient exhaust port.  

Another great addition to the Moto-10 from its predecessor is the NMR bumpers (no missed races).  I’ll admit when I first saw them I was not a big fan, but after spending some time with the helmet  not only do I see the necessity in them, but don’t notice them on the helmet at all. The point of the  bumpers is that if you are in a crash where the helmet comes in contact with your body, the  bumpers will absorb the impact rather than your body. Possibly saving you from a broken shoulder  or collarbone.

Another safety feature on the Moto-10 is the way the peak works. The peak is held on by 2 screws  on either side, with the addition of 2 plastic set pins that keep the visor from moving too much  when you are adjusting it. However, the pins are designed to break as a result of a crash. BELL  has just used 2 bolts on either side to remove the fixed point in the middle of the helmet. What this  does is that in a crash where you hit the visor, all of the energy is sent away from the top of your  head and down the sides. If you didn’t already know, you don’t want a large impact on the top of  your head if at all possible.  

For me personally, the BELL Moto-10 is the easiest helmet to work on and maintain. The tooless  screws (the screw has a flap that flicks out allowing you to undo it without the use of tools) that  hold the peak in place can easily be removed, and pins pop out to remove the peak when you want to clean it. The cheek pads are held in with 3 magnets, instead of traditional poppers. This not only makes it easy to get out when cleaning, but also easier to get out if you are involved in a crash. The main inner of the helmet is held in with 4 poppers, 2 at the front and 2 at the rear, making it straightforward to remove all the inners when you want to wash them.

It seems that cooling was an important factor when they designed the Moto-10. Not only have they  increased airflow around the helmet with the split shell, they have incorporated recycled jade into  the helmet liner. The Virus CoolJade liner has natural cooling effects and decreases your skin  surface temperature by around 5°C. Not something that I thought I would benefit from living in the  UK where we’re lucky to see temperatures around 20°C, but even on a day where we were in high  single digits, it did have an impact whilst I was riding. The whole helmet just felt cooler whilst riding,  I didn’t feel like my head was getting cold by any means. It just felt like I was able to concentrate  harder for longer. I definitely think during the summer months this would benefit a lot of riders who  suffer from dizziness and mental fatigue.

The final thing I want to mention is the goggle port. The BELL Moto-10 offers the largest port on the  market. I use a SCOTT Prospect 90% of the time and it is a very wide goggle. Sometimes it can be  difficult to get a proper seal on my face with other helmet brands. But with the Moto-10 I had room  to spare. The main reason I mention this is because I think it gets overlooked a lot of the time when 

people are deciding which helmet to buy. You need to factor in the type of goggles you are going to  wear with the helmet.

The Tomac 24 Moto-10 is up there in price. Coming in at £699.99 it’s one of the dearer helmets, but  I do believe you get what you pay for when it comes to helmets. After all, we get one head and you  need to look after it. I get that some people simply can’t afford that price tag, but for those that can, it certainly is a sound investment. If price is an issue for you here drop me an email at  [email protected] and I’ll be happy to try and point you in another direction. 

At current there are 6 different colour ways for 2024, but older years are also available if one of  those colours takes your fancy. As I mentioned at the top, this isn’t a Moto-10 exclusive, but  hopefully, you learned something about the helmet that you didn’t already know.

Tested and written by Brad Wheeler

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