Stat Sheet: Round Eight

There is so much that goes on at each FIM Motocross World Championship round that it is inevitable that you will overlook certain things. That is where our regular ‘Stat Sheet’ feature comes into play, however, as we focus on the details that you may have overlooked.

Holeshot (Moto One)

Gautier Paulin

Best Times (Moto One)

Jeffrey Herlings

1:48.984

Tim Gajser

1:49.859

Gautier Paulin

1:49.935

Romain Febvre

1:50.203

Antonio Cairoli

1:50.662

Laps Led (Moto One)

Jeffrey Herlings

18

Vergrößern

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Jeffrey Herlings led every lap at the Grand Prix of Germany.

KTM Images/Ray Archer

Holeshot (Moto Two)

Gautier Paulin

Best Times (Moto Two)

Jeffrey Herlings

1:46.860

Gautier Paulin

1:48.413

Tim Gajser

1:48.632

Romain Febvre

1:48.717

Antonio Cairoli

1:49.071

Laps Led (Moto Two)

Jeffrey Herlings

19

– Jeffrey Herlings was beaten straight up in free practice for the first time in eleven months at the Grand Prix of Germany. Herlings was not the quickest in the session at the Grand Prix of Russia, admittedly, but did not even compete at that round. The last time that he was not the fastest in a free-practice session that he competed in was at the Grand Prix of Lombardia in June last year, which was three hundred and thirty days ago.

Vergrößern

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Jeffrey Herlings leads the premier class by forty-eight points.

KTM Images/Ray Archer

– The raw speed that Jeffrey Herlings possessed at the Grand Prix of Germany was simply phenomenal. The way in which he sprinted away from the pack on the opening lap of the second moto left most in awe; he was seconds quicker than the competition on a track that did not give the guys a lot of options. That period from the second moto is highlighted in the table below.

Jeffrey Herlings

Gautier Paulin

Difference

Lap 1

1:50.669

1:50.896

0.227

Lap 2

1:48.431

1:49.993

-1.562

Lap 3

1:48.398

1:50.330

-1.930

Lap 4

1:47.111

1:49.231

-2.120

Lap 5

1:46.860

1:48.632

-1.952

Lap 6

1:46.877

1:48.670

-1.793

– Jeffrey Herlings claimed the seventy-third overall win of his career this past weekend and his fourth in Germany. Germany is one of twenty-one countries that he has won in throughout his career. The Netherlands is where he has been most successful, as he has claimed twelve overall victories on home turf, then Italy is close behind. Herlings has also won in Latvia, Brazil, Portugal, Belgium, Mexico, France, Russia, the Czech Republic, Qatar, Thailand, Bulgaria, Sweden, Finland, Germany, Spain, Great Britain, Argentina, the USA and Switzerland. Indonesia will almost certainly be the next country that gets added to that list.

Vergrößern

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Jeffrey Herlings has missed out on two overall wins this year.

KTM Images/Ray Archer

– Early on in moto one, Jeffrey Herlings was told by his mechanics to work on his speed through the first sector. Herlings, being the brilliant student that he is, immediately responded and went faster than anyone else on that part of the track. The board was put out on lap five. The difference is really quite clear in the table below, especially when compared to the rider who was in second at the time.

Jeffrey Herlings

Gautier Paulin

Difference

Lap 4

0:31.071

0:30.455

+0.616

Lap 5

0:30.951

0:30.247

+0.704

Lap 6

0:29.981

0:30.390

-0.409

Lap 7

0:30.021

0:30.546

-0.525

Lap 8

0:30.109

0:30.381

-0.272

Lap 9

0:30.115

0:30.815

-0.700

– Considering that he had a substantial lead at the end of the second moto, one would have presumed that Jeffrey Herlings would have backed it down. The times that he recorded did not really drop at all, however, and he was still pulling away from Tim Gajser. It is not like the latter could afford to rest too much either, as Gautier Paulin was nipping at his heels and just four seconds behind at the chequered flag.

Jeffrey Herlings

Tim Gajser

Difference

Lap 14

1:49.082

1:50.605

-1.523

Lap 15

1:49.843

1:51.674

-1.831

Lap 16

1:49.869

1:50.563

-0.694

Lap 17

1:50.124

1:51.269

-1.145

Lap 18

1:49.458

1:51.457

-1.999

Lap 19

1:51.203

1:53.964

-2.764

– Following the Grand Prix of Germany, Jeffrey Herlings has now led more laps than the rest of the field combined this season. Herlings has led one hundred and fifty-five laps at this point. In total, the rest of the class have led one hundred and thirty-six. Antonio Cairoli (one hundred and four), Clement Desalle (twenty), Romain Febvre (seven) and Gautier Paulin (five) are the four guys who make up that total.

Vergrößern

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Red Bull KTM instructed Jeffrey Herlings to improve in sector one.

KTM Images/Ray Archer

– Tim Gajser secured a season-best finish of second at the Grand Prix of Germany. Who else managed one to do that in one of the motos? Amazingly, just one other rider: Stefan Ekerold was eighteenth in the second moto and scored his first points of the season. The field is a little depleted at this point in the season, so one would have presumed that more riders would have been able to take advantage of that.

– Antonio Cairoli had his worst finish of the season at the Grand Prix of Germany and it could have been even worse, as the only reason that he finished fifth in moto two was because Romain Febvre had a spectacular crash. When was the last time that he finished both motos at a round and scored thirty-one points or less? It was actually just at the Grand Prix of Sweden last year, where he acquired a ninth and a seventh in the two motos.

– Is Teutschenthal usually this cruel to Antonio Cairoli? No, not at all. Cairoli won at the circuit the last two years, but then finished outside of the top ten before that. It is appropriate to wipe that from the record, however, as he was carrying an arm injury that was sustained one week before. Other than that round, this is the worst that he has performed at the Grand Prix of Germany since his switch to the premier division.

Vergrößern

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Antonio Cairoli lost a significant amount of points in Germany.

KTM Images/Ray Archer

– Aside from Teutschenthal, which will end up being one of the worst results that he encounters this season, Antonio Cairoli has been a picture of consistency thus far, hence why he has three hundred and thirty-eight points in the standings. Is it normal for the rider in second place to have that many points after eight rounds? No, as that has never happened in the MXGP (previously named MX1) class.

– Five different manufacturers (KTM, Honda, Husqvarna, Kawasaki and Yamaha) were represented in the top five in the overall classification. When was the last time that happened? It was actually at the Grand Prix of Sweden in August last year, as those five manufacturers also finished at the front of the pack there. The order in which they piled into the top five was quite different to Teutschenthal though.

– Romain Febvre has not yet finished on the podium this season, so his campaign must be considered a disappointment. The Monster Energy Yamaha Factory Racing rider has, however, ended fourth or fifth overall at seven of the eight rounds that have been run. The fact that he keeps missing out on tasting champagne by the slightest of margins has become a running joke in the paddock.

– Although Romain Febvre has not yet tasted success, he has finished on top in the warm up session at two rounds this season. Jeffrey Herlings was the quickest at the six other rounds. Although that particular session means very little in the grand scheme of things, it is still a confidence booster and something to cling onto.

Vergrößern

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Romain Febvre is in desperate need of a breakthrough now.

Monster Energy Media/Ray Archer

MX2

Holeshot (Moto One)

Jorge Prado

Best Times (Moto One)

Jorge Prado

1:53.036

Ben Watson

1:53.784

Jed Beaton

1:53.980

Calvin Vlaanderen

1:54.187

Pauls Jonass

1:54.214

Laps Led (Moto One)

Pauls Jonass

18

Vergrößern

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Jorge Prado claimed his third victory of the season in Germany.

KTM Images/Ray Archer

Holeshot (Moto Two)

Jorge Prado

Best Times (Moto Two)

Jorge Prado

1:49.949

Pauls Jonass

1:50.024

Henry Jacobi

1:50.925

Calvin Vlaanderen

1:51.066

Ben Watson

1:51.828

Laps Led (Moto Two)

Jorge Prado

18

Vergrößern

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Pauls Jonass managed to maintain his series lead on the tricky track.

KTM Images/Ray Archer

– It is no secret that Teutschenthal was one-lined and, consequently, there were not too many passes in the motos. Jorge Prado was caught out by that in the first encounter, as he undoubtedly had the speed to beat Pauls Jonass. The lap times below highlight the end of that first moto and the point where the difference between the two really tightened up. Prado later admitted that there was not really anywhere to make a pass stick.

Pauls Jonass

Jorge Prado

Difference

Lap 13

1:55.179

1:55.901

-0.722

Lap 14

1:55.778

1:55.202

+0.586

Lap 15

1:55.211

1:55.182

+0.029

Lap 16

1:55.111

1:54.904

+0.207

Lap 17

1:55.740

1:56.197

-0.457

Lap 18

1:55.350

1:55.232

+0.118

– Calvin Vlaanderen and Ben Watson could have finished on top in that first moto as well, as their times were quicker than the KTM-mounted riders at points. The times that those two recorded during the same period as the table above can be viewed below. It is worth noting that those four riders started in the same position that they finished in and were separated by just four seconds at the chequered flag.

Calvin Vlaanderen

Ben Watson

Difference

Lap 13

1:55.999

1:54.734

+1.265

Lap 14

1:55.220

1:55.505

-0.285

Lap 15

1:55.261

1:54.966

+0.295

Lap 16

1:55.977

1:54.915

+1.062

Lap 17

1:54.976

1:55.361

-0.385

Lap 18

1:55.430

1:54.933

+0.497

Vergrößern

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Ben Watson continues to go from strength to strength with Kemea Yamaha.

Monster Energy Media/Ray Archer

– When was the last time that the top four riders in an MX2 moto finished just four seconds apart at the chequered flag? Intriguing question! Jorge Prado, Pauls Jonass, Thomas Covington and Jeremy Seewer were separated by three and a half seconds in the final moto at the Grand Prix of Trentino last season. There was a gap of four hundred days exactly between those events.

– Ben Watson had the speed to finish on the podium again at the Grand Prix of Germany, but just missed out at the end of the second moto. There is a chance that he would have been able to pass Calvin Vlaanderen, had he not lost so much time in sector two each lap. The difference was significant. Vlaanderen could not identify what he was doing so much better than his competition on that part of the track though, when questioned in a post-race podcast.

Calvin Vlaanderen

Ben Watson

Difference

Lap 14

0:27.217

0:27.368

-0.151

Lap 15

0:26.999

0:28.140

-1.141

Lap 16

0:26.676

0:27.617

-0.941

Lap 17

0:26.590

0:27.552

-0.962

Lap 18

0:26.600

0:27.750

-1.150

– The Grand Prix of Teutschenthal was undoubtedly the best that Calvin Vlaanderen has ever performed. Although he finished on the overall podium at the Grand Prix of Latvia last season, he was fifth and fourth in the motos. ’10’ had never actually finished in the top three in a moto before this past weekend. It was quite the step up for him to almost win that opening moto!

– When was the last time that there was a CRF250R rider on the Teutschenthal podium? It was actually not as long ago as one might presume, as Tim Gajser won the Grand Prix three years ago and was on the box the year before that as well. Before Gajser, however, no Honda rider had ever finished on the MX2 podium at the German round, so Calvin Vlaanderen is only the second rider to manage it.

Vergrößern

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Calvin Vlaanderen broke through with the HRC squad in Germany.

Honda Racing Corporation

– Michele Cervellin is having his best start to a season ever. Cervellin has been running from a privateer outfit thus far and, although he missed rounds two and three, scored one hundred and thirty-nine points. Cervellin actually scored exactly the same amount through the first eight rounds last year, when he was with the HRC squad, but did not skip any events. One could question why he feels that moving onto pastures new is wise.

– Thomas Covington made more passes than anyone else at the Grand Prix of Germany, despite the tricky conditions, following some awful luck at the start of each moto. Twelve passes were made in the first moto, which gave him thirteenth, and fourteen passes were made whilst en route to seventeenth in the second encounter. It was a tricky day for the Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing rider, but he did well to salvage as many points as he did.

– Whilst one American struggled, another obtained a season-best finish. Marshal Weltin was fourteenth in the final moto, which was his best result by quite some way, and nineteenth overall. Who else had a season-best finish on the hard-pack layout? Calvin Vlaanderen (third), Mathys Boisrame (ninth), Simone Furlotti (eleventh), Tom Koch (sixteenth), Andrea Zanotti (nineteenth) and Richard Sikyna (twentieth).

Words: Lewis Phillips | Lead Image: Monster Energy Media/Ray Archer

MX Vice Editor || 25